Apr 25 2012

#361 “Predator”

From Pierre Nabokov,

Given the traditional yet mysterious association of wolves with sexual predation, it is not entirely surprising that this particular wolf is inquiring about little girls. After taking just a quick glance at the demented look in this creature’s eyes and examining his gaping, fang-filled maw, any individual in his right mind would surely take it upon himself to hide the members of his family that are closest to him in order to protect them from harm… especially his children. Interestingly enough, the human animal, much like the wolf, is a creature that can easily share the same aggression that we witness in this particular illustration. It’s somewhat fitting then that this picture achieves common ground with a recent viral video that touches on this subject. Take a look back at the famous interview with Antoine Dodson, and you’ll see what I mean.


Apr 23 2012

#359 “Czechoslovakian Wolfdog”

From Kristyn in the Czech Republic

Taken from Wikipedia: The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog (or Vlčák/Vlčiak) is a relatively new breed of dog that traces its original lineage to an experiment conducted in 1955 in Czechoslovakia. After initially breeding 48 working line German Shepherds with 4 Carpathian wolves, a plan was worked out to create a breed that would have the temperament, pack mentality, and trainability of the German Shepherd and the strength, physical build, and stamina of the Carpathian wolf. The breed was engineered to assist with border patrol in Czechoslovakia but were later also used in search and rescue, schutzhund, tracking, herding, agility, obedience, and drafting. It was officially recognized as a national breed in Czechoslovakia in 1982. 


Apr 22 2012

#358 “The Room”

From David in Siauliai, Lithuania

This illustration was accompanied with the following letter:

You know, J, I really like the forest, but most of all I love colored lights, in the evenings when I hear the nightingale sing; it warns me of upcoming night. Then the forest gains new sounds. Windy nights remind me of the sea. I don’t know how, but I find myself going into the dark woods. Somehow I feel everything will be perfect; I’ll find the light, even though this forest looks mysterious and scary. Finally, the sounds of the forest connect with the lake and space around me to form the strange shape of a room: the place where I am at this moment… Before my eyes, I see a red glowing table. On this table is a cup of black coffee. This coffee is talking and it smells like fir trees.

Near the coffee is placed an envelope and a note: “My mind depends on this room, there are no mirrors, but it reflects you. Everyone of you.”

I ask myself: Where am I?

And the Coffee says: You’re in a strange shape room. Please, look at the cup. Watch it.  In a couple of minutes you’ll meet the woman: she’ll show you a gel. Then she’ll go out.

I: What women?

Coffee: There is something you cannot see. The blue light goes on and the wolf will come. He’ll watch you for a while. Light goes off. Light goes on.

I: No wolf, no wolf, no wolf.

Coffee: Now. Take the old small radio from behind the table. Do you see the door in a left corner of the room? Open it. There will be a
room with strange floors and the cross on the wall. Sit down in the chair. This chair saves people from vampires.

I: Whats next?

Voice of the Coffee from the radio: Look at the mirror. This is a mirror.

You’re the women.

The woman: Hi. I’m wearing black. Do you like me? There… Look! This is the white wolf. He is the owl. Ask him. (she runs away.)

I: What do I ask?! Wait!

Voice of the Coffee: You may be happy now. Get back in the strangely shaped room. Sit down.

Then all becomes dark. I can’t see.

To be continued.


Apr 8 2012

#344 “Perspectives”

From a stranger in Chicago, Illinois

One of the first things that struck me about this illustration was the fact it offers a dual depiction of its lupine subject: there is the straightforward bust in the top portion of the illustration as well as the wolf profile at the bottom of the page. This dichotomy of artistic perspectives naturally led me back to the polarity of views concerning the wolf itself. It is a creature that is revered by some and despised by others. To some it is a savage beast and a merciless killer, to others a lonesome and mysterious spirit guide into a world beyond our understanding. But regardless of whether you stand as a supporter or detractor of this controversial creature, one thing remains certain: the wolf is alive and well in the world today and it will not be denied…


Apr 3 2012

#339 “Space Oddity”

From GMR in Phoenix, Arizona

Since May 1st, 2011, probably as many as a dozen illustrations have been posted on this site which feature the image of a wolf in space or operating some type of flying vehicle. While at first this concept might strike the viewer as strange, it actually makes perfectly good sense. Just as man has for centuries peered into the deepest reaches of space and longed to test the boundaries of the universe, so too does the wolf seem to gaze up at the lonesome moon and cry out with a sort of wistful yearning. And while our hopes and dreams might not be tied together as intimately as we might imagine, the truth of the matter is that that bright, enticing orb which rules the nighttime sky calls to all of us in some mysterious way…


Mar 19 2012

#324 Music Month (19)

From Hannah in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Today’s Song/Video: “Crying Wolf: Le Chant De Loup” by Enya


Feb 29 2012

#305 Awareness (29)

From Sarah in Chicago, Illinois

Today’s link: Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary (New Mexico)

Our Mission:

  1. To operate and manage a lifetime sanctuary for displaced, unwanted, and un-releasable captive-bred wolves, wolf-dogs, and other related species, utilizing such resources as may be available from local, city, state, and private entities or individuals;
  2. To educate the general public about wolves, wolf-dogs, and other related species and our environmental and ecological issues related to wildlife;
  3. To generate self-supporting, sustainable revenue resources to assist in the financial support of the sanctuary.

Feb 16 2012

#292 Awareness (16)

From Autumn in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Today’s link: wolfsanctuary.net

Wolf was established in order to improve the quality of life for all wolves and wolf-dogs.

Our mission will be met by accomplishing the following strategic objectives:
Rescue – save captive-bred wolves and wolf-dogs whose caretakers are no longer able to provide for them, for whatever reason.
Sanctuary – provide life-long homes that take into account not only the animal’s physical requirements but also its emotional needs.
Education – teach the general public about wolves in order to foster more realistic opinions concerning their value in the wild and the compromises required of their spirit due to captivity.


Feb 15 2012

#291 Awareness (15)

From Kelsey in Nine Miles Falls, Washington

Today’s link for Wolf Awareness Month is wolfcountry.net. I found this site somewhat randomly, but when I stumbled across it, I found it to be a great resource for everything from factual information to myths and tales to shopping. Check out the site and enjoy!

WolfCountry.net: dedicated to promoting wolf education.


Feb 14 2012

#290 Awareness (14)

From Skylar of Signal Mountain, Tennessee

Artists for Conservation: Support Nature through Art

Mission and Vision:

“At AFC, our mission is to support wildlife and habitat conservation, biodiversity, sustainability, and environmental education through art that celebrates our natural heritage. Through international art exhibits, collaborative art-science expeditions, publications and cutting-edge online initiatives, we engage, inspire and inform the public, and empower passionate professional artists as effective ambassadors for the environment.”


Feb 11 2012

#287 Awareness (11)

These two works come to us courtesy of two beautiful women who shared them on the WBS facebook page: Debbie Blount and Sandra Grifo Montimurro. Please visit the WBS facebook page to see more of the fine work by these creative and dedicated artists. I hope these artistic triumphs will brighten your day as much as they did mine.

Best wishes, “J”

NRDC: Save Biogems – Wolves

NRDC selects special places across the Americas that face an imminent threat of destruction: pristine coastlines that could become industrial ports; ancient forests that could be stripped of trees; and unspoiled wildlife habitats that could be sacrificed to oil and gas drilling. Our imperiled BioGems are irreplaceable remnants of wilderness that curb global warming, preserve biodiversity and provide sanctuary for rare and extraordinary wildlife, from threatened polar bears to endangered gray whales.


Jan 31 2012

#276 Less is More (31)

From David in Siauliai, Lithuania

I only received this illustration yesterday, but I have already experienced so much joy in trying to unfold its intricate mysteries that I simply couldn’t resist sharing it as soon as possible… Enjoy! And bravo to David for this epic creation.

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a
stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in
awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.”

~ Albert Einstein

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Jan 21 2012

#267 Less is More (22)

From a stranger in an unknown place

The idea of the ancient/enduring wolf being outfitted with modern rocket technology led me on an interesting trip around the Internet where I ultimately stumbled upon this interesting fact. It certainly does make your head spin to realize how swiftly times are changing…

“The small chip inside today’s throwaway musical greeting card has more computing power in it than existed in the entire world prior to 1950.”

~ David D. Thornburg, Ph.D.


Jan 21 2012

#266 Less is More (21)

From M. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Feeling sick? Check out these wolf-related remedies for what ails ya!

In ancient Rome, barren women attended the Roman festival Lupercalia (named for the legendary nursery cave of Romulus and Remus) in the hopes of becoming fertile.

According to Pliny the Elder, a first-century Greek scholar, wolf teeth could be rubbed on the gums of infants to ease the pain of teething. He also reported that wolf dung could be used to treat both colic and cataracts.

The Aztecs used wolf liver as an ingredient for treating melancholy. They also pricked a patient’s breast with a sharpened wolf bone in an attempt to delay death.

During the Middle Ages, Europeans used powdered wolf liver to ease the pain of childbirth and would tie a wolf’s right front paw around a sore throat to reduce the swelling. Dried wolf meat was also eaten as a remedy for sore shins.

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Jan 18 2012

#263 Less is More (18)

From a stranger in Long Island, New York

Enjoy a few facts about that alluring and mysterious call of the wolf: the howl.

Wolves howl to contact separated members of their group, to rally the group before hunting, or to warn rival wolf packs to keep away. Lone wolves will howl to attract mates or just because they are alone. Each wolf howls for only about five seconds, but howls can seem much longer when the entire pack joins in.

Biologists have found that wolves will respond to humans imitating their howls. The International Wolf Center in Minnesota even sponsors “howl nights” on which people can howl in the wilderness and hope for an answering howl.

Wolf howls may be audible to the human ear up to ten miles away in good weather conditions.

While howling, wolves change pitch to achieve harmonic as well as discordant effects.

Since lone wolves have no established territory, they rarely howl.


Jan 16 2012

#261 Less is More (16)

From a stranger in Burnsville, North Carolina

FACT: The earliest known drawings of wolves are in caves in southern Europe and date from approximately 20,000 B.C.

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Jan 15 2012

#260 Less is More (15)

From Lisa in Nottingham, England

A special thanks is due to Lisa for submitting these photographs of her own fantastic wolf sculptures. This occasion marks another first for the WBS project and also helps to stretch the boundaries of the art which this unique collection boasts.

“People compose for many reasons: to become immortal; because they want to become a millionaire; because of the praise of friends; because they have looked into a pair of beautiful eyes; or for no reason whatsoever.”

 ~ Robert Schumann

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Jan 14 2012

#259 Less is More (14)

 

From Arantxa in Colombia

 

“I have seen the movement of the sinews of the sky,
And the blood coursing in the veins of the moon.”

~ Muhammad Iqbal

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Jan 13 2012

#258 Less is More (13)

From Jeremy

Happy Friday the 13th!

 

“Listen to them. Children of the Night.
What music they make.”

~ Dracula (1931)

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Jan 11 2012

#256 Less is More (11)

From Emily in Castaic, California

This piece is a little long, and probably shouldn’t fall under the “less is more” heading, but trust me… it’s worth reading.

“Thinking Like a Mountain” by Aldo Leopold

A deep chesty bawl echoes from rimrock to rimrock, rolls down the mountain, and fades into the far blackness of the night. It is an outburst of wild defiant sorrow, and of contempt for all the adversities of the world. Every living thing (and perhaps many a dead one as well) pays heed to that call. To the deer it is a reminder of the way of all flesh, to the pine a forecast of midnight scuffles and of blood upon the snow, to the coyote a promise of gleanings to come, to the cowman a threat of red ink at the bank, to the hunter a challenge of fang against bullet. Yet behind these obvious and immediate hopes and fears there lies a deeper meaning, known only to the mountain itself. Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.

Those unable to decipher the hidden meaning know nevertheless that it is there, for it is felt in all wolf country, and distinguishes that country from all other land. It tingles in the spine of all who hear wolves by night, or who scan their tracks by day. Even without sight or sound of wolf, it is implicit in a hundred small events: the midnight whinny of a pack horse, the rattle of rolling rocks, the bound of a fleeing deer, the way shadows lie under the spruces. Only the ineducable tyro can fail to sense the presence or absence of wolves, or the fact that mountains have a secret opinion about them.

My own conviction on this score dates from the day I saw a wolf die. We were eating lunch on a high rimrock, at the foot of which a turbulent river elbowed its way. We saw what we thought was a doe fording the torrent, her breast awash in white water. When she climbed the bank toward us and shook out her tail, we realized our error: it was a wolf. A half-dozen others, evidently grown pups, sprang from the willows and all joined in a welcoming melee of wagging tails and playful maulings. What was literally a pile of wolves writhed and tumbled in the center of an open flat at the foot of our rimrock.

In those days we had never heard of passing up a chance to kill a wolf. In a second we were pumping lead into the pack, but with more excitement than accuracy: how to aim a steep downhill shot is always confusing. When our rifles were empty, the old wolf was down, and a pup was dragging a leg into impassable slide-rocks.

We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes – something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters’ paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.

Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.

We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness. The deer strives with his supple legs, the cowman with trap and poison, the statesman with pen, the most of us with machines, votes, and dollars, but it all comes to the same thing: peace in our time. A measure of success in this is all well enough, and perhaps is a requisite to objective thinking, but too much safety seems to yield only danger in the long run. Perhaps this is behind Thoreau’s dictum: In wildness is the salvation of the world. Perhaps this is the hidden meaning in the howl of the wolf, long known among mountains, but seldom perceived among men.