Dec 11 2011

#225 “Magical Forest”

From Elowyn in Chattanooga, Tennessee

The notion that wolves often reside in forests is nothing new to most of us, but something about this particular patch of woods depicted by 10-year-old Elowyn speaks to me in a way that is more powerful than I would have anticipated. There’s something almost Tolkien about the woods in which this complacent wolf finds itself, something magical, almost supernatural in certain ways. The trees and branches intertwine in a beautiful macrame of twisted wonder. Green shrubs sprout freely from the fertile soil of the enchanted ground. Birds and squirrels twitter and chirp in an innocent chorus of natural beauty. And in the midst of it all sits the majestic king of this charmed woodland, the lupine lord of the forest.

This is world so magical and so full of wonder that it could only be the brainchild of a young lady. Even her name, Elowyn, seems to represent her enchanted themes. Even though they are not pictured here, her work brings to mind scenes of knights and castles, elves and goblins, wizards and warriors. Ultimately, there is an endearing juxtaposition between the artist’s relative inexperience in life and her enduring themes of mystery and wonder. Although she is young, Elowyn has artistically produced a mystifying forest that seems older than time itself. In the end it all goes to show that perhaps those who have just recently entered this world have a more innate connection with the supernatural wonder of it. It makes one wonder where we came from, where our souls resided before they entered this material world. And all of this from the hand of a child, a hand that held Crayola crayons…


Oct 12 2011

#165 “Half Baked”

From J.S. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Have you ever met a man whose three favorite things were wolves, marijuana, and Sponge Bob Square Pants? Well, I can’t say for sure, but I think you have now. His name is J.S. and he lives in Philadelphia. Why J.S. would choose such an unusual focus for his WBS submission is beyond by limited powers of comprehension, but I can only assume that he has a special affinity for these specific items.

I realize that I clearly cannot serve as judge and jury of the normality of this man’s interests. After all, I do collect pictures of wolves drawn by strangers from all other the world, and some would say that it doesn’t get a whole lot weirder than that. But this still doesn’t make the motives behind J.S.’s work any clearer. I suppose there is a part of me that believes that this unusual piece of art might be the result of mere whimsy and randomness. Perhaps it is simply meant to keep us all guessing. But then there’s the drug reference. Could this possibly mean that the artist himself was under the influence when he designed this piece? And if so, is there any way that we will ever be able to interpret its true meaning? Then again, maybe the drug reference is both the inspiration for the picture and the key to interpreting it. Maybe only a mind that is equally as inebriated as that of the artist would be able to shed light on the meaning of this work…


Jul 17 2011

#78 “Scribble Wolf”

From Craig

There are certain individuals who walk among us who can look at an everyday object that most of us would find mundane or unnoticeable, and in their mind’s eye, that ordinary object is transformed into something unique and extraordinary. I’ve always been amazed at how some people just seem to have this unique gift of “interpretation.”

When I gaze upon this impressive wolf by Craig, I am assured that he must be one of these talented artists who simply has that “creative eye.” Can you imagine what this illustration must have looked like in its early stages? I would love to see a time lapsed video of Craig constructing this wolf. How amazing it would have been to see the scribbles, the scant lines, the incomprehensible mess slowly transform into the beautiful bust of a proud wolf. Break this illustration down, and you would have nothing but a disarrayed jumble of chaotic markings, an explosion of cluttered marks, lying in shambles… but put them all together in the proper order, and look at what may be accomplished. Simply breathtaking.

In honor of this piece, I went searching on the web for other works of art that were made from discarded or everyday items. Check out this site, and be amazed.

Bravo, Craig. Fantastic work.