Jan 21 2012

#266 Less is More (21)

From M. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Feeling sick? Check out these wolf-related remedies for what ails ya!

In ancient Rome, barren women attended the Roman festival Lupercalia (named for the legendary nursery cave of Romulus and Remus) in the hopes of becoming fertile.

According to Pliny the Elder, a first-century Greek scholar, wolf teeth could be rubbed on the gums of infants to ease the pain of teething. He also reported that wolf dung could be used to treat both colic and cataracts.

The Aztecs used wolf liver as an ingredient for treating melancholy. They also pricked a patient’s breast with a sharpened wolf bone in an attempt to delay death.

During the Middle Ages, Europeans used powdered wolf liver to ease the pain of childbirth and would tie a wolf’s right front paw around a sore throat to reduce the swelling. Dried wolf meat was also eaten as a remedy for sore shins.

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Jan 16 2012

#261 Less is More (16)

From a stranger in Burnsville, North Carolina

FACT: The earliest known drawings of wolves are in caves in southern Europe and date from approximately 20,000 B.C.

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Aug 31 2011

#123 “Ignis Lupis”


From “Iginis Lupis” in Monterrey, Mexico

Proud. Stern. Fair.

Ignis Lupis: The Wolf of Fire.

The beauty of this breathtaking illustration is not lost on me, but what intrigues me even more is the choice of pen name of the artist. I obviously love the fact that the name reflects the passion and spirit of wolf, but what about the fact that the phrase is in Latin? What connections can be made here?

There are some, in their naivete, who might claim that since Latin is a dead language, it is an inappropriate language to serve as a moniker for a wolf-related artist who is supposed to represent the vitality and virility of the lobo. I, however, would beg to differ. Latin is not dead, but very much alive. It flows through ancient texts and works of art like a beautifully artistic river of history. It is aesthetically pleasing both in its sound and in its lines on the page. It is regal. It is stately. It embodies everything the wolf stands for in a lexical form.

“Ignis Lupis.” The name rolls off the tongue like honey and tastes just as sweet in your mouth. Say it with me. Say it aloud: “Ignis Lupis,” The Wolf of Fire.