Philosophy

The wolf is a creature that has traditionally been associated with savagery and general wildness. It brings to mind images of silent and serene mountain snowfalls and desolate desert landscapes. The wolf is synonymous with an untamable sense of pride and virility. In fact, the very phrase “lone wolf” is one that has pervaded our cultural lexicon and indicates someone who is a rebel or an attractively dangerous free agent on a personal vendetta; but conversely, the wolf can also call to mind images of maternal instinct and a strong and unified family unit.

It has ironically become a symbol for strains of young hipsters seeking counter or subculture images to screen across too-tight t-shirts, but it is simultaneously a mystical creature whose identity is ingrained in the earliest stories and histories of this land’s original settlers. And finally, if none of these arguments seem to ring true, one can’t deny the connection between the figure of the wolf and that of man’s best friend, the domestic canine. The wolf represents all of the features of the dog that man yearns to come in contact with but is ultimately too fearful to address directly. In short, man fears the wolf, but he also admires it. It calls to his sense of pride, it fulfills his yearning for raw violence, it is both social and fiercely independent, it is everything we want to be.

Today’s society needs the spirit of the wolf more than ever.

In a nation in which our most extreme Orwellian fears are beginning to present themselves as real possibilities…

In a community in which the commercialization of eco-friendly products and activities has reached a level that is, in fact, so trendy that it is counterproductive…

In a world in which technological access to information has actually succeeded in merely producing a higher level of indolence in our youth…

In a country in which an individual spiritual identity is losing ground in our children every day…

In this type of world, we should look to the wolf more than ever for inspiration and guidance in all aspects: spiritually, environmentally, socially, and psychologically.

So now, let us turn to the task at hand. In short, what I am honestly and earnestly requesting is your participation in a global experiment designed to strengthen the common bond between lovers of the wolf and lovers of art for art’s sake.

The concept is simple: distribute this information to anyone and everyone you know and ask them to mail the fruits of their creativity to “Wolves by Strangers.” There’s no telling where this project may lead, but I am excited to say that I have already received wolves from most U.S. states as well as from Canada, Mexico, Slovenia, Belgium, Australia, Indonesia, Germany, England, Sweden, France, Scotland, The Czech Republic, Lithuania, Colombia, Denmark, Poland, New Zealand, Romania, Austria, The Netherlands, Israel, China, and Japan- all of which will be posted in due time. Please consider adding your own art to this growing collection. With the cooperation and participation of others, there’s no telling what we may accomplish.